Monday, 26 May 2014

My Reward

Laura at The Ferry Tavern - too nice to sit inside

Glutten for punishment perhaps.  But after Roy's charity walk yesterday I was inspired  to drag husband back to the Inn and the pint I'd  miss out on.  Another 11 mile walk - Pickerings pasture to Fiddlers Ferry marina and back.
I recommend this as a must do walk, all on the trans pennine trail with  great views of the Mersey, lots of birds and dragonflies about. Real ale at the pub, mine was a refreshing dark fruit cider!
And a bonus, hubby's donating £11, £1 amile for today's stroll!
Cheers  Roy and all
Laura 

ROY'S CHALLENGE

Members of RSPB Liverpool joined Roy on his Challenge yesterday; Chris Tynan, Laura Bimson, Rhodie Blythe and Jenny Jones.


Transpennine trail
It was a good day for a walk, the weather held out until 5pm as the troopers pasted Fiddlers ferry Marina.
Intermittent  birding was allowed,  yellow wagtail, lapwing chicks and up to 70 godwits on carr lane pools. Reed bunting and warblers in the reeds along the disused canal Widnes to Fiddlers ferry marina.

Plenty of people about, charity cycle racers from Manchester to Liverpool shared  the trans pennine trail with us, not to mention other cyclists who need to go on a cycling proficiency course, or buy themselves a bike bell as least.
Heading for cake and tea!

Our groups doggie partners Charlie and Yella had plenty of opportunities to meet the locals canines, fortunately without incident. Dog walks please clean up after your pooches.

Roy's challenge incorporates looking at accessibility for the disabled. On this part of the  trans pennine route the paths were fairly good with the odd puddley sections around Widnes. The steps at pickings pasture  up towards Runcorn bridge are in impassable for those in chairs/scooters. Main difficulties for Roy were around kissing gates and squeeze stiles met with  at various points, fortunately Roy's  FourX  -4 wheel drive, 4 wheel steer chair  managed them with difficulty.  Anna, Roys'  wife tasked as  mechanic in charge when dismantling the hand rests, sometines required to enable Roy to squeeze the chair through these obstacles. (Other outdoor wheelchairs or mobility scooters would probably not of  got through).
Pretty Pickerings


Only other incident was when Roy went cross country and tried going across a stretch of grass at Halewood, needless to say there had to be a rut, and the chair got stuck in it, all hands to the deck to heave it out, won't be doing that again.  No harm done.
In a rut!
Swans Spike Island
Mersey view towards Fiddlers Ferry








All in all another successful day on the challenge. Chris managed  to make it to the end  complete with blisters.  I baled out after 14 miles at the Fiddlers ferry inn, no I didn't prop up the bar - alas my lift home was already waiting for me. 

Tired but happy Laura




Roy' s coast to coast Wheelchair Challenge


Dear colleagues, friends and family
As many of you will know, in September 2013 I was diagnosed with Motor Neurone Disease. It is not a very nice illness.

Although I can still hobble a few yards with the aid of a stick, all my walking is now done from a wheelchair. Like many other people I love being outdoors and watching wildlife. It makes me feel alive. Yet despite purchasing the best four wheel drive wheelchair on the market, many paths suitable for disabled people like myself, are INACCESSIBLE, due to stiles, kissing gates and other obstacles. Many paths I could access yesterday are today out of bounds!

It needn't be like this!!!

While I can' t change what happens in the wider countryside, working for the RSPB, I can ensure that the 20 superb RSPB Nature Reserves in northern England, are exemplars of accessibility for people with disabilities, mobility problems and for parents with prams!

So, introducing Roy' s coast to coast Wheelchair Challenge to raise money to improve accessibility in the countryside!
Southport to Hornsea
215 miles along the Trans-Pennine Trail
In the wheelchair
In just 10 days
Other wheelchairs and legs welcome!

During this year, I will be auditing the accessibility of all RSPB Nature Reserves in northern England and drawing up a prioritised list of actions for change from installing wheelchair friendly access points to better views from hides. 100% of the money raised by the Wheelchair Challenge will be spent directly on implementing the changes I identify.

The Wheelchair Challenge programme.

Saturday 24th May Day 1 Southport to Childwall, Liverpool 22.25 miles

Sunday 25th May Day 2 Childwall, Liverpool to Lymm, Warrington 21.5 miles


Monday 26th May Day 3 Lymm, Warrington to Stockport 19.75 miles
Tuesday 27th May Day 4 Stockport to Woodhead Reservoir, Peak District 20.75 miles
Wednesday 28th May Day 5 Woodhead Reservoir, Peak District to Wombwell, Barnsley 21 miles

Thursday 29th May Day to let the muscles recover!

Friday 30th May Day 6 Wombwell, Barnsley to Thorpe in Bain, nr Doncaster 22.75 miles
Saturday 31st May Day 7 Thorpe in Bain, ne Doncaster to Selby 22.5 miles
Sunday 1st June Day 8 Selby to Faxfleet on the Humber Estuary 20 miles
Monday 2nd June Day 9 Faxfleet on the Humber Estuary to Hull 21.5 miles
Tuesday 3rd June Day 10 Hull to Hornsea 15 miles and Finish!!!

Am afraid the walk is going to be a bit unstructured re timings during the day - largely because we don't know what access obstacles we are going to come across! For example, a did a recce at Pickerings pastures, Runcorn yesterday and I can't get the wheelchair up the 52 steps! So here, the van will pick us up and drop us off under Runcorn bridge to continue the route.
However, each day will start at 9.30 and as we are travelling around 21 miles a day it will probably take 7 - 8 hours.

http://www.transpenninetrail.org.uk/walkers/map-for-walkers/








Thursday, 22 May 2014

WeBS Whimbrel snippet

Whimbrel -Steve Round

Thought you may like to know that last Sundays WeBS core count produced a record number of Whimbrel for the Mersey. There were 38 birds counted (7 on Garston Shore) beating a previous best of 30 birds.

http://www.bto.org/volunteer-surveys/webs


Warren.

Ouzel doozie and Cuckoo a choo


Aber waterfall - Bimo




Ellen loved their times at Aber. She loved to walk upon the beach and gaze across the strait towards Llanfaes. She loved to follow the shallow, meandering river that flowed through a deeply wooded glen, and she loved to watch for that flash of silver amidst the trees ahead, anticipating her first glimpse of the surging waterfall that splashed over a sheer cliff in a narrow ribbon of white water, the Whiteshell River...  From the Princes of Gwynedd – S Penman


Last Saturday was one of those great birding days out not to be forgotten, for all the right reasons and not just because we had gone to Wales and for once the weather was glorious. Our trip up the Aber mountain was to look for specialist mountain and woodland bird and I'm pleased to say we were not disappointed.
The remarkable weather saw the troops out in numbers and we were lucky to get a parking space, but our early start had paid off.

The river meanders by the car park, what a start, twas an omen perhaps of good things to come. Bobbity, bob, dipper, back and forth to its nest, zipping under the bridge where we stood...wonderful.

Happily we set off alongside the path that runs along the river, the Afon Rhaedr Fawr. Woodland, shrubs and grassy glades either side. We were aiming for the Aber waterfall; here the River Afon Goch plunges about 120 feet over a sill of rock, a view worth the trip alone.

Eyes to the skies, it wasn't long before we were treated to aerial cat fight between  that exquisite fork tailed  prince of the  hills a red kite and a  more familiar common buzzard ..mew! 
Red Kite - Neil P

Next  a captivating fierce goshawk rising high over the woodland-  a much better sighting than the previous week at Lake Vyrnwy, noticeably paler, short broad wings and a long tail, (natures adaption to help it manoeuvre through  the trees). Later sightings of Sparrowhawk and kestrel completed the raptors for the day.

Bluebells  - Bimo






The path to the falls is a stunning place, bluebells carpeted the glades, hawthorn blossom gleamed white and smelt divine. A quiet place for a picnic or ponder or for some a happy home...ponies roamed in the dappled shade.
Ponies in shady glade  - Bimo




The stream babbled and rippled, birdsong hung in the air...chiff chaff, willow warbler, blackcap, song thrush, great, blue and long tailed tit, goldcrest to name a few, many binoculars hunted them down.



A streak of red led us to another target, a resplendent redstart, darting from tree to fence post and back, fine views for all. A gt spotted a woodpecker briefly kekked his way through the woods.
Pied flycatcher - Neil P



A male pied flycatcher obligingly sitting on a branch, his female close by. One never tires of admiring this bird, so striking and only here for a few months of the year.

Arriving at the plunge pool, the waters flowed a little faster over the rocky bottom; here a crafty grey wagtail plundered the riverbed.


Seekers - Neil P


Cuckoo calling high over the rocky cliff face, but where? all eyes trained above, a luring call and then a stroke of luck, a flight from tree to rock and back, then settled on the craggy top 'the gowk' our harbinger of spring.

Cuckoo in flight- Neil P













Stomachs rumbled, we strolled back to the car park picnic tables, what a great morning. 

After lunch we travelled a short distance to access an open hilly area in the valley of the Afon Anafo. An even smaller car park and some tight spatial awareness parking.

Stonechats were the kings and queens of the scrub with occasional meadow pipit accompaniment, but what we were looking for was an upland elusive bird, a blackbird with a twist… the ring ouzel with its white breast-band and yellow circled eye.

Afon Anafo valley - Neil P
Another spectacular valley, a green vista, scree slopes, ancient stone ruins with the Anafo flowing through it. We purposefully trod along the path, the wind more blustery on the higher ground. What's that...another cuckoo calling!? Sure enough, as if our path was tracked a cuckoo sat on a stone wall below, being mobbed by meadow pipits; hey... they may have been mum and dad!
Second cuckoo interlude over we decided to stop a while and spread out along the path, giving ourselves the best opportunity to scan the slopes, it worked, after ten minutes success Chris found our bird, feverishly foraging for grubs high on the slopes above.  A great bird to end our trip, a lifer tick for many.




Laura

Friday, 16 May 2014

Give nature a home at RSPB Burton Mere Wetlands.

Child at RSPB BMW - Ron Thomas



Discover how to give nature a home this May half-term Learn ways to transform household rubbish into a home for nature this half-term at RSPB Burton Mere Wetlands.

From making bug homes to butterfly feeders, visitors to the nature reserve can take part in a variety of fun activities and find out how to attract more insects to their garden.
Dan Trotman, Visitor Development Officer at RSPB Burton Mere Wetlands, said:  Having a wide range of insects in the garden is important, as they provide lots of benefits   including being a great food source for all kinds of other wildlife, from birds to hedgehogs and even badgers!
Making bug homes from bamboo and plastic bottles and butterfly feeders  from bottle tops and paper plates is an easy and exciting way to recycle household waste. Families visiting the reserve during half term can take advantage of these activities and spend time building the bug homes and butterfly feeders, before taking them home to start creating a haven for wildlife in their outdoor space.

Families can also enjoy the fun self-led trail around the reserve and use our popular Wildlife Explorer backpacks to investigate the wildlife that isn t so easily seen. And with the new extended Reed and Fen trail now opening up the reserve s Explorer Zone, families can really experience the wild of the wetland.
The butterfly feeder sessions will be held on Wednesday 28 May and bug home making will be on Thursday 29 May. Both sessions run from 11 am 3 pm at Burton Mere Wetlands. The activity costs  4 per child ( 3 RSPB members).
For more information on the reserve and its activities, please call the reserve on 0151 353 8478, or check out the website

Friday, 9 May 2014

Speke Garston Coastal Reserve's 10th Birthday celebrations


Anne & Ingrid muck in....way to go girls
Litter-picking on a grand scale !
Two members of the Liverpool local RSPB group and also the Ramblers Association joined teams from the city council, South Liverpool Housing and Peel Holdings on a massive beach clean-up down at Speke/Garston coastal reserve on friday 02/05/14. The event was organised as part of a celebration of 10 years of this reserve, and produced a record 5 skips of rubbish after the winter storms. The sun shone, the shore line looked infinitely more attractive once relieved of its load of old bottles and other plastic, and there were lots of opportunities to talk about the birds that use the estuary, especially in winter. All in all, everyone agreed it was an excellent way to spend a Friday morning ! -  Anne Pope

Saturday 3rd saw some of the group back for the open day - planned to include leisure and walking activities to promote the 70 acre Speke Garston Coastal reserve and encourage people to use this great natural resource. 
Sheltered in the Liverpool sailing clubs meeting room, 
Information tables laid out ready for the public
Chris positioned on the balcony with telescope.. what a tremendous view of the river, marsh and and beyond. Members of the public were able to talk to Chris and see the birds on mudflats and shrubland, whimbrel, dunlin, mallard, shelduck, oystercatchers, canadian geese, kestrels, sedge warbler, whitethroats, skylarks and wheatears to name a few.
We were joined by the Ramblers association, Bikeright, NHS Liverpool community health and the Garston Historical Society. 
Walkers on the reserve path





Buffet and a mega Birthday cake was generously supplied by the sailing club and was served to all who entered, a welcome break after one of the 'Brisk walks"! 
Landscaped Birthday cake

Local dog walkers were hailed to join us from the balcony! Although the pooches didn't get to eat the cake.



And as it was a special occasion for the community, a Garston Eagle was invited. Maria Eagle mp for Garston came in the afternoon to cut the cake and undertake the Sailing club big 'power switch on' - after securing a grant the sailing club has been able to build a new new multi million pound clubhouse, connected to electricity for the first time! 

RSPB leader Chris Tynan meets local Mp Maria Eagle
Needless to say RSPB Liverpool never miss an opportunity and we asked Maria to support the Westminister debate/referendum on the Maltese migration bird massacre.
http://www.chrispackham.co.uk/
http://www.birdlifemalta.org/view.aspx?id=444#.U2yu6fk7vTp
https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/stop-spring-hunting-on-malta#home

And we were pleased to see Maria tweeted her support 

Maria Eagle MP ‏@meaglemp May 7
'The slaughter of migratory birds in Malta is abhorrent and Owen Paterson should raise this issue with officials at European Union asap'



For the last 3yrs Liverpool RSPB has started their Big new year bird watches at this reserve, and hope a higher profile will improve facilities and accessibility on the reserve. (Easy walk, but Garston coastal path could be muddy, and parts of the path walk not suitable for wheelchairs)
The opening of the gate to Speke hall grounds gives you the opportunity to extend a walk/use facilities....(charge may apply).


Speke Garston Coastal Park reserve car park at the end of Blackburne Street /Garston Shore Rd. L19 8JD

Read about our field trips

http://liverpoolrspb.blogspot.co.uk/2013/01/big-day-watch.html
http://liverpoolrspb.blogspot.co.uk/2012_01_01_archive.html

Laura

Roy' s coast to coast Wheelchair Challenge

Roy Taylor


Dear colleagues, friends and family
As many of you will know, in September 2013 I was diagnosed with Motor Neurone Disease. It is not a very nice illness.

Although I can still hobble a few yards with the aid of a stick, all my walking is now done from a wheelchair. Like many other people I love being outdoors and watching wildlife. It makes me feel alive. Yet despite purchasing the best four wheel drive wheelchair on the market, many paths suitable for disabled people like myself, are INACCESSIBLE, due to stiles, kissing gates and other obstacles. Many paths I could access yesterday are today out of bounds!

It needn't be like this!!!

While I can' t change what happens in the wider countryside, working for the RSPB, I can ensure that the 20 superb RSPB Nature Reserves in northern England, are exemplars of accessibility for people with disabilities, mobility problems and for parents with prams!

So, introducing Roy' s coast to coast Wheelchair Challenge to raise money to improve accessibility in the countryside!

Southport to Hornsea
215 miles along the Trans-Pennine Trail
In the wheelchair
In just 10 days
Other wheelchairs and legs welcome!

During this year, I will be auditing the accessibility of all RSPB Nature Reserves in northern England and drawing up a prioritised list of actions for change from installing wheelchair friendly access points to better views from hides. 100% of the money raised by the Wheelchair Challenge will be spent directly on implementing the changes I identify.

The Wheelchair Challenge programme.

Saturday 24th May Day 1 Southport to Childwall, Liverpool 22.25 miles

Sunday 25th May Day 2 Childwall, Liverpool to Lymm, Warrington 21.5 miles


Monday 26th May Day 3 Lymm, Warrington to Stockport 19.75 miles
Tuesday 27th May Day 4 Stockport to Woodhead Reservoir, Peak District 20.75 miles
Wednesday 28th May Day 5 Woodhead Reservoir, Peak District to Wombwell, Barnsley 21 miles

Thursday 29th May Day to let the muscles recover!

Friday 30th May Day 6 Wombwell, Barnsley to Thorpe in Bain, nr Doncaster 22.75 miles
Saturday 31st May Day 7 Thorpe in Bain, ne Doncaster to Selby 22.5 miles
Sunday 1st June Day 8 Selby to Faxfleet on the Humber Estuary 20 miles
Monday 2nd June Day 9 Faxfleet on the Humber Estuary to Hull 21.5 miles
Tuesday 3rd June Day 10 Hull to Hornsea 15 miles and Finish!!!

Am afraid the walk is going to be a bit unstructured re timings during the day - largely because we don't know what access obstacles we are going to come across! For example, a did a recce at Pickerings pastures, Runcorn yesterday and I can't get the wheelchair up the 52 steps! So here, the van will pick us up and drop us off under Runcorn bridge to continue the route.
However, each day will start at 9.30 and as we are travelling around 21 miles a day it will probably take 7 - 8 hours.

http://www.transpenninetrail.org.uk/walkers/map-for-walkers/



Wednesday, 7 May 2014

Salford Quays Bird Watching Cruise


Salford Quays Bird Watching Cruise (08:00 - 10:00)
**Not run by Liverpool RSPB


Saturday 24 May, 2014


Join experienced local birdwatchers and our tame birder from the Greater Manchester Local Record Centre as you cruise around the stunning surroundings of Salford Quays and along the Manchester Ship Canal to the former Pomona Docks.

The area is steeped in industrial history, Salford Quays once being the busiest port in the world and is classified as a Site of Biological Importance.

Over 100 species of bird have been seen here in recent years including Mute Swan, Cormorant, Grey Heron Kingfisher, Lapwing, Moorhen, Grey Wagtail, Skylark, Song Thrush, Dunnock, Bullfinch Goldfinch and
Greenfinch.

On last years cruise we watched a Peregrine Falcon feeding on prey on a penthouse flat balcony and sand martins hawking for insects over the ship canal. Kestrel and Sparrowhawk were also hunting alongside the canal.

Please note although there is a sheltered cabin below deck, it' s advisable to bring appropriate clothing in case of adverse weather conditions and should you wish to birdwatch from the open top deck.

Don' t forget to bring your binoculars.

Tickets  11.00 per person can be purchased on-line:
Departure point - Lowry Footbridge (Lowry Centre side of Salford
Quays). To left of footbridge. 

Parking   Lowry Outlet Mall, The Quays, Salford M50 3AH


Monday, 5 May 2014

BANK HOLIDAY DOTTERELS.

MON 5TH MAY.

Started the day very early (6-05am) with my first BTO survey walk along the Leeds-Liverpool canal. My walk starts a few miles out of Maghull, it involves a leisurely stroll along the canal towpath northwards for a few miles recording all the birds you see along the way. Very easy surveywork to carry out and I would highly recommend it to anyone, very well organised by BTO who allocate a stretch of waterway for you to cover.
Along the way some new birds for the year which were.......corn bunting singing on the wires, house martins back on territory collecting mud for their nests, yellowhammer singing away and a group of 5 whimbrels that flew low overhead calling as they went past.
 Also seen.......reed warbler, sedge warbler, whitethroat, chiffchaff, red legged partridge, 2 common sandpiper, tree sparrow, coot with young, mallard with young(14), 3 wheatear, skylark.
Walk takes about 1.5 hrs, and only other person seen 1 cyclist. A great way to start the day.

 What next.....a walk up a big hill!


PENDLE HILL.

         arrived about 11am, never been before, but if you think that walk at Lake Vyrnwy was tough you should try this little hill. Very easy access, parking on roadside just after village of Barley, to the east of Pendle Hill. Total walk took about 1.5 hrs, a bit steep but well worth it. A few other birders coming of the hill pointed me in the right direction as the bird where well away from the trig point (summit) which being a bank holiday was quite busy. 3 birds seen 1 male and 2 females, and yes...... the females are the good looking ones!
Hope you like the pictures, great birds to photograph, sat down and they came as close as 10m. Spent about 20 min with them, then left them in peace.

SEAN.


























TAKE ACTION ON HEN HARRIER DAY




Hen Harrier 'Bowland Betty'


LEST WE FORGET BOWLAND BETTY

http://liverpoolrspb.blogspot.co.uk/2013/08/hen-harrier-on-brink-of-extinction-in.html


The concept of Hen Harrier Day was inspired last year by Alan Tilmouth (you can read about it on his blog, here   http://dustybins.blogspot.co.uk/2013/08/hen-harrier-day.html)  It was an inspired move – basically for conservationists to take back the so-called ‘Glorious 12th’ (the opening of the grouse- shooting season) and celebrate this beautiful bird that has virtually been ‘cleansed’ from the grouse moors of northern England (and most grouse moors in Scotland, too).

Last year, Hen Harrier Day was celebrated by hundreds of people using the #HenHarrier hash tag on Twitter and other social media. This year, the campaign is going to be even more visible with a series of planned public protests in the northern uplands.

The newly-formed campaign group Birders Against Wildlife Crime (http://birdersagainst.org/) has joined forces with Mark Avery to organise four legal, peaceful and media-friendly public protests in four counties where grouse-shooting is a dominant force: Derbyshire, Yorkshire, Cumbria and Northumberland.
The date for the protests has been set as Sunday 10th August 2014. This date was chosen in preference to the inglorious 12th (which falls on a Tues this year) to enable more people to attend.

According to Mark Avery, (http://markavery.info/2014/05/05/hen-harrier-day-10-august-2014/)  so far over 200 people have emailed to say they’d like to be involved. This is a fantastic opportunity to make a lot of noise about a subject that has received relatively little media attention in relation to the severity of the situation. The Hen Harrier has virtually been wiped out as a breeding species from England, and is in serious decline in large areas of Scotland (predominantly those areas used for driven grouse shooting).
Enough is enough and it’s time to fight back.

For further information, check out the Hen Harrier Day campaign on the BAWC website  -http://birdersagainst.org/projects/hen-harrier-day/

To express an interest in taking part and to receive updates about the protests, please email Mark Avery: mark@markavery.info

Read how a Perthshire farmer feels
http://gentleotterblog.blogspot.co.uk/2014/05/imposing-culture.html?spref=tw


It is easy to sit up and take notice,
What is difficult is getting up and taking action.

Laura

Lake Vyrnwy 27th April, 2014



11 birders met at Brunswick Station and set off for Wales in a minibus, with Chris doing the driving. 

On arrival we were joined by two more from the Liverpool group and 3 people from Ellesmere Port.  What a treat we had in store!  Near the visitor centre we saw Chaffinch, Robin, Siskin, Buzzard and Coal Tit.

We started walking the blue trail.  Very soon we came across a female Pied Flycatcher,darting back and forth to a nestbox, beak full of nesting material. It kept us entertained for quite some time, collecting twigs, some were difficult for the little bird to manoeuvre into the box.  And where's there's one, we soon found the male.
Female Pied




Male Pied
Soon afterwards we saw a resplendent Redstart  a Nuthatch and a very smart Pheasant strutting his stuff!

Up in the forest,we came across a lovely clearing with wonderful views. A Tree Pipit was seen flying between a tree and some rocks.  Very soon it landed on a radio mast and was renamed the Mast Pipit, so a new one for all of us!!!  The farmer came up in his quad bike, one hand on the bike, one round his dog, but he still managed a wave.  He left a very happy flock of sheep after he gave them food.
Male Redstart
A copse in the same area gave us another wonderful sighting  of a Redstart on a post. 








Always on the look out for a moment of light humour, Arnie  appeared on edge, 'don't do it Chris Everton will soon regain their form' !
The prankster














Suddenly a Peregrine Falcon came into sight over the hilltop and a very high flying Cormorant followed by Ravens.

we continued the walk and soon came to the woods, there had been a great deal of clearance so not the prettiest place to be.  Piles of newly felled logs and a stumpy wasteland ahead, still the pied and grey wagtails of the area were quiet happy with the area, flitting about, no doubt the clearance had uncovered lots of insect prey.
Logging


Shortly after another highlight of the walk, Arnie's  wonderful hearing picked up the song of a Wood Warbler a short metallic tick that accelerates into a trill that is reminiscent of a coin spinning) and after some pishing it appeared for us all to ogle.  Such a pretty bird, a lovely yellow colour with gleaming white underparts.



And at last our quarry, high up in the sky, a Goshawk  scanning the forestry below, alas no closer view. One day we'll see this vivacious  sweeping effortlessly through the canopy.

After lunch we ventured onto the  lakeside hides. On the path to the hides , a dipper was spotted flying down a woodland stream . The weather was on the turn, a heavy down pour the precursor for the rest of the day   perhaps a reason for the hide birdlife to be quiet with the exception  of once again a delightful pair of Pied Flycatchers, chasing each other back an forth over the woodland enclosed pool at the top of the lake.

The heavens opened once, time for a hasty retreat to the minibus in the hailstones and so back to our Liverpool home. 

Rhodie
Pics - Neil P
Laura